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Monday, December 03, 2012

Victorian Christmas Traditions - Christmas Cards


One of the first signs of Christmas was the arrival of the Christmas card in the post. In 1843 Henry Cole commissioned an artist to design a card for Christmas. The illustration showed a group of people around a dinner table and a Christmas message. Only 1000 cards were printed that first year and were expensive, but the pattern for the future was formed. At one shilling each, these were pricey for ordinary Victorians and so were not immediately accessible. However the sentiment caught on and many children - Queen Victoria's included – were encouraged to make their own Christmas cards.
In 1870, postage was reduced to one half penny per ounce and a cheaper color lithography was used for printing. Thus began the real spread of the Christmas card. By the 1880s the sending of cards had become hugely popular, creating a lucrative industry that produced 11.5 million cards in 1880 alone. By the early 1870s, the custom had reached the United States. At first, designs were simple, but as technology advanced, new subjects evolved. By the 1860s, popular designs were Christmas feasts, church bells, snowbound mail-coaches and turkey and plum puddings.

2 comments:

  1. Interesting how traditions start. And maybe fade.

    I love making Christmas cards, and I love getting them. It's the one time of the year I make sure I get my cards out.

    Maybe an e-card for a birthday or celebration. But a paper card for Christmas.

    Thanks Audra for these insights.

    ~ciao
    LA

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  2. Leslie, you make the most gorgeous cards. Paper for Halloween, too. Right?

    Hmm, I better start working on that Christmas letter...

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